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Chicago Research Summit Schedule

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Breakout [clear filter]
Friday, October 18
 

10:30am CDT

Compare and Contrast for Context: Using Couples and Throuples When Teaching with Primary Sources
This presentation will examine the effectiveness of grouping materials together for comparison or contrast when teaching with primary sources. I will briefly introduce the audience to the types of instruction we do at the Newberry, and then demonstrate an instruction session using images from Newberry materials related to the Gilded Age in Chicago. We will consider each source individually, and then pair them together to evoke a discussion about the depth of information two or three items can lend to each other. We will also review what story or point of view might be missing from these sources, as well as the effectiveness of the demonstration and how it can be adapted for other topics, collections, or institutions.

Speakers
LS

Lisa Schoblasky

Special Collections Services Librarian, Newberry Library


Friday October 18, 2019 10:30am - 10:50am CDT
Johnson Center 206

10:30am CDT

Journalism as community-based service learning
Journalism and social justice have a long history together. However, the idea of journalists performing service learning bumps up against journalistic ethics of objectivity. This session describes a class that addressed this dilemma by establishing clear guidelines with a partner organization. The “Photojournalism and Social Justice” class was created in partnership with DePaul’s Steans Center for Community-Based Service Learning. In a 10-week course, students produced photo essays on a social justice theme. They worked closely with a community organization, Erie House, that provides education, health and legal services for immigrants. Students visited one of Erie House’s location, learned about the history of settlement houses in  Chicago, and met the staff of the organization. Students then consulted with staff as they reported their stories with the goal of publication in local media. A written partnership agreement explained that the benefit was not PR for the organization, but rather broader public understanding about social justice issues.

Speakers
RH

Robin Hoecker

Assistant Professor, DePaul University



Friday October 18, 2019 10:30am - 10:50am CDT
Johnson Center 208

10:30am CDT

Linking Students to Chicago's Political History
"Linking Students to Chicago's Political History" will discuss some of the strategies and resources that high school and college teachers can use to actively engage their students in Chicago's dramatic political history and contemporary political life. Strategies range from getting students to find, write about, and discuss news stories on issues that involve the Mayor or City Council, such as combating neighborhood violence, improving schools, or keeping the city's vital services working. Students can also research biographies of various important Chicago mayors from William Ogden to Lori Lightfoot. They can read or perform parts of their Inaugural Addresses. Teachers can also lead political walking tours that stop at sites where important political events occurred, including where Lincoln and others were nominated for president. They can walk through City Hall and the Thompson Center that houses key Illinois state departments. We'll also brainstorm to come up with other strategies and ideas.

Speakers
avatar for R. Craig Sautter

R. Craig Sautter

Instructor/Author, DePaul University
For nearly four decades, R. Craig Sautter has taught courses in philosophy, politics, history, literature, and creative writing at DePaul University. He is author, coauthor, or editor of 10 books, including three on the history of presidential conventions and elections. He was the... Read More →



Friday October 18, 2019 10:30am - 10:50am CDT
Johnson Center 211
  Breakout, 20 Minutes
  • about Co-author of Inside the Wigwam: Chicago Presidential Conventions 1860-1996

10:55am CDT

Cross-Departmental Collaboration and Undergraduate Engagement with Research
We will share some of the pedagogical and administrative successes as well as institutional lessons learned through the Newberry Library’s Undergraduate Seminar Programs.
The Newberry offers two yearly seminars that combine traditional coursework, curated displays of collection materials, and student-led archival research projects. While topics of the courses vary, offerings reflect the collection strengths, including Chicago and the Midwest. We will describe and analyze these programs and their use of interdisciplinary teaching teams, faculty
research fellowships, librarian and archivist-led classes, and institutional partnerships. In addition to providing an overview of the programs, we will include discussion surrounding course syllabi, library orientation and instruction course designs, and student testimonials. We hope that attendees will leave with some strategies for achieving this productive dynamic.

Speakers
MH

Mary Hale

Program Manager of Scholarly and Undergraduate Programs, Newberry Library
MC

Margaret Cusick

Newberry Library


Friday October 18, 2019 10:55am - 11:15am CDT
Johnson Center 206

10:55am CDT

Making a Neighborhood Food Culture Documentary
For the final assignment my first-year “Food in History” course, my students make a 5-minute documentary on the food culture of a Chicago neighborhood. In this session I will describe the the process I use to prepare students for this project.  The process involves understanding the rhetoric of film, analyzing documentaries, developing historical research techniques and learning film production basics. I will provide copies of the handouts I distribute to my students. The session will end with viewing some representative videos.

Speakers
DK

David Koeller

Professor of History, North Park University



Friday October 18, 2019 10:55am - 11:15am CDT
Johnson Center 208

1:40pm CDT

Chicago History at Chicago Public
The Chicago Public Library system is home to over 500 unique archive collections as well as historic municipal publications and a wide range of neighborhood newspapers. Focused on individuals, communities, organizations and events, these collections chronicle large and small stories across Chicago’s diverse neighborhoods.
Archivists and Librarians from the Harold Washington Library Center Special Collections, the Vivian G. Harsh Research Collection and the Northside Neighborhood History Collection will highlight collections and discuss services for undergraduates and faculty. We offer a range of sessions designed to orient students to archival research with hands-on examination of historical materials. Our sessions are customizable by topic or material type and with flexible options for presentation that can include interactive or instructor-designed activities.

Speakers
EL

Elizabeth Loch

Chicago Public Library
avatar for Michelle McCoy

Michelle McCoy

Senior Archival Specialist, Chicago Public Library
RM

Roslyn Mabry

Chicago Public Library
JL

Julie Lynch

Chicago Public Library



Friday October 18, 2019 1:40pm - 2:00pm CDT
Johnson Center 206

1:40pm CDT

Developing a Course-Based Undergraduate Experience (CURE): Lessons Learned from the What’s In Your Soil Project
This session will focus on the design and implementation of Course-based Undergraduate Research Experiences (CUREs), with particular focus on a CURE I have developed in my 300- level environmental science course (ENV 310-Environmental Soil Science). A CURE is a learning experience in which whole classes of students address a research question or problem with unknown outcomes or solutions that are of interest to external stakeholders. CUREs afford students opportunities to make discoveries that are of interest to the broader scientific community or other stakeholders outside the classroom. In this session I will discuss the history of CUREs, including their features and how they are different from other types of lab experiences, the benefits of a CURE to students and faculty, and how my ENV 310 CURE, called the “What’s In Your Soil?”, has transformed my pedagogy.

Speakers
avatar for James Montgomery

James Montgomery

Associate Professor, DePaul University
Session Title: Developing Course-based Undergraduate Research Experiences (CURE) - Lessons Learned from the "What's in Your Soil?" Project


Friday October 18, 2019 1:40pm - 2:00pm CDT
Johnson Center 208

2:05pm CDT

Demystifying the Museum Experience: Using DePaul Art Museum in Your Courses
DePaul Art Museum’s collection and exhibition manager Laura-Caroline Johnson and Faculty Forum co-chair Heather McShane will show you how to use visual thinking strategies (VTS) to become comfortable engaging with art, no matter your academic discipline, and help you incorporate DePaul Art Museum into your courses. We will present various ways to use the museum, while giving you an overview of the collection and upcoming exhibitions at DPAM.

DPAM presents the artworks of those artists and communities historically omitted from the art historical canon. Our growing permanent collection of over 3,500 objects and our exhibitions reflect both the museum and university’s goals around social justice, innovation, and diversity. DPAM’s teaching vision is to open minds and build curiosity for lifelong learning, to be a space that allows for the development of close-looking and critical thinking skills, and to be a resource for faculty and teachers throughout Chicago.

Speakers
LJ

Laura-Caroline Johnson

Collection & Exhibition Manager, DePaul Art Museum at DePaul University
HM

Heather McShane

Writing, Rhetoric, and Discourse Faculty, DePaul University


Friday October 18, 2019 2:05pm - 2:25pm CDT
Johnson Center 206

2:05pm CDT

Gendered Transitions: Women's Experiences of Experiential Education
Our research focuses on the experience of young women attending a semester long urban internship program.  We spent two years conducting interviews with women studying off-campus at Chicago Semester, exploring learning outcomes that resulted from the program.  One of the major findings was that engaging in experiential learning in a context that was unfamiliar to them was transformative for the young women, not only in terms of the content of their learning, but also for their personal growth and their growth in confidence.  Our data suggest the importance of experiential learning to nurturing young women’s awareness of self and confidence in their professional and life skills.

Speakers
RB

Rebecca Burwell

Chicago Semester
avatar for Mackenzi Huyser

Mackenzi Huyser

Executive Director, Chicago Semester


Friday October 18, 2019 2:05pm - 2:25pm CDT
Johnson Center 208

2:30pm CDT

Chicago Quarter: Chicago as extended classroom and topic of research
In this session, you will learn about DePaul University’s Chicago Quarter program, which is required of all undergraduate students during their first quarter. In Discover Chicago and Explore Chicago classes, students travel around the city studying various aspects of the city. Topics range from “Radical Tradition in Chicago” to “Theatre Making in Chicago” to “Chicago Latinx Writers” to “Justice in the City.” Experiential learning during excursions is complemented by research via many sources, including books, journals, online databases, the DePaul library system, the Chicago History Museum, and discussions with Chicagoans from many fields and parts of the city. We will discuss various student assignments and class excursions, welcoming questions and ideas from those present.

Speakers
DL

Doug Long

DePaul University
LB

Leah Bryant

DePaul University



Friday October 18, 2019 2:30pm - 2:50pm CDT
Johnson Center 206

2:30pm CDT

Tell us about it: facilitating student research through Chicago area based site visits
 “Great Chicago Libraries” is a unique Chicago-based learning experience for Elmhurst College Honors students. Taught over the last 15 years by faculty librarians, the credit course uses David Kolb’s “City as Text” pedagogical method to structure ethnographic and physical explorations of Chicago-area libraries. Using experience and assignments drawn from the class, we will present examples of course curricula, pedagogy, and student-generated artifacts from the exploration and research of notable Chicagoland institutions. We will offer critical commentary and advice on how to structure similar programs at your institution.

Speakers
PC

Peg Cook

Librarian, Elmhurst College
JH

Jacob Hill

Elmhurst College
EP

Elaine Page

Head of Technical Services, Elmhurst University
JP

Jennifer Paliatka

Elmhurst College
DG

Donna Goodwyn

Elmhurst College



Friday October 18, 2019 2:30pm - 2:50pm CDT
Johnson Center 209

2:30pm CDT

Zines, Libraries, and the Chicago Community
Firmly rooted in the tradition of independent publishing and presses, zines and other similar small-run publications have been instrumental in understanding creative communities, often serving as the glue that holds them together. Libraries are especially well-suited for showcasing and exploring the potential value of both reading, collecting, and making zines. For the past five years, Columbia College Library’s Aesthetics of Research initiative has been devoted to tying artists to resources both on campus and in the arts community, with an eye toward indie and underground art forms.  We have developed a rich vein of programming devoted to zines in the Library, including a Zine Exchange, monthly zine nights, and assorted other programming with ties to the Chicago zine-making community. This session will explore how libraries can foster zine-making efforts on campus, provide an overview of zine-related resources in the Chicago community, and examine the possibilities for zine-making in the classroom.  

Speakers
KB

Kristy Bowen

Columbia College Chicago


Friday October 18, 2019 2:30pm - 2:50pm CDT
Johnson Center 208

2:55pm CDT

From Social Problems to Social Promise:Teaching Undergraduate Students at North Park University How to conduct Social Promise, Peaceology, and Better News Research
As the founder of the epistemology of Social Promise that has a subcomponent of Peaceology, and Better News Research, I teach North Park University students in my Methods in Social Research course how to conduct research using that framework. For instance, while in the traditional Social Problems apprpach researchers ask “why is here so much violence in Chicago,” in the Social Promise tradition, we ask, “why isn’t there even more violence, in Chicago”? The findings of this new approach to questioning provide remarkable insights to the students and their audiences. Theoretical, methodological, policy, programmatic, and ethical implications are outlined.

Speakers
PS

Peter St. Jean

Chair, Department of Sociology and Criminal Justice, Chair, Criminal Justice Major, School of Professional Studies, North Park University



Friday October 18, 2019 2:55pm - 3:15pm CDT
Johnson Center 206

2:55pm CDT

Meaningful Engagement with and Contribution to Special Collections
Exposing first-year students to Special Collections can demystify using the publications in research and possibly lead students to contribute their own works to such collections. In the Fall 2018 term, students in the DePaul University course Alternative Cultures: Artists’ Books and Zines held, handled, looked at, read, and experienced artist’s books and zines at various libraries, bookstores, print shops, and studio spaces and talked with artists, writers, and librarians throughout the city before creating their own publications. At the end of the term, these creations were donated to the Special Collections at DePaul’s Richardson Library. In this session, you will learn how to plan and prepare to teach similar courses, how to scaffold lessons for these types of courses, and how to create meaningful assignments.

Speakers
HM

Heather McShane

Writing, Rhetoric, and Discourse Faculty, DePaul University


Friday October 18, 2019 2:55pm - 3:15pm CDT
Johnson Center 208

2:55pm CDT

Writing Chicago: Engaging Students in Rhetorics of the City
In this presentation, I describe how my Writing Chicago course introduced students to rhetorics of the city and supported them as they worked on their own academic, creative, and community-based writing projects. Writing Chicago—an English course taught in Woodlawn in the spring of 2019 in partnership with the Wheaton-in-Chicago program—invited students to (1) analyze the literature of Chicago writers from 1893 to the present, (2) conduct research on Chicago-area discourse communities and sites of writing, (3) take advantage of the rich programming available to Chicago-area writers (e.g., at the American Writers Museum, Poetry Foundation, and Newberry Library), and (4) work on a grant proposal for a local not-for-profit organization. The presentation highlights specific pedagogical strategies for teaching place-based writing and research.

Speakers
JE

James E. Beitler

Wheaton College


Friday October 18, 2019 2:55pm - 3:15pm CDT
Johnson Center 209